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Tag Archive: sweet potatoes

Sweet Potato and Sage Risotto

January 27, 2016 Leave your thoughts Print this page

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I MADE IT. I’M A SECOND SEMESTER SENIOR.

Basically, I have no idea what just happened to me? One minute I was walking through the door with my space cats backpack in August, and the next I was dragging myself out of school while wearing a Pusheen the Cat onesie and bright yellow sunglasses in January? Confusion?

A heavy snowstorm fell on my town the night after the last day of first semester, and when I awoke the next morning, the world was still, covered in a blanket of lovely white. I felt so peaceful watching the flakes fall from the sky, knowing that I had reached the stressful apex of my high school career and was about to giggle my face off on the ride down. With the heat cranked up and my fuzzy purple blanket wrapped around my shoulders, I took out a pencil and just…wrote. Wrote about everything I’ve felt, everything that’s taken place, everything I look forward to in the next few months. It was so nice to just breathe a sigh of relief, because the past five months have been insanely, insanely stressful at times.

On Sunday night, I decided to cook up this risotto after yoga class. And while it’s a delicious dish, I’ve come to realize that it’s more than that: RISOTTO IS A METAPHOR FOR MY LIFE. I know you are now groaning because I’m about to go off on a tangent, but BEAR WITH ME PLEASE, my English teacher this year doesn’t let me be creative and I need to let my imagination fly somewhere.

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The thing about risotto is that you have to stir it. CONSTANTLY. And it gets annoying at times and your arm starts to hurt and you start yelling at your spoon, but you keep going, because you will ruin that risotto if you stop. And just when you think your risotto is done, you take a bite and even after three additions of liquid, it’s still too al dente. But you keep on keeping on, stirring and tending to that risotto until it’s just perfect. And you eat it and cry because carbs are beautiful, especially on a winter night.

Right now, I’m in the transition: I’m stirring my own personal risotto, and it’s not done yet. I’m getting there, but it’s not ready. I’m still adding things, still adjusting the seasonings, still searching for a balance. I am a very impatient person when it comes to waiting for things, so I get anxious and frustrated and awkward at times, but I just keep going, because I know that a delicious future is ahead of me. And I just gotta breathe and get through it.

But hey, stirring can be fun. I can still sing and dance like a fool. I can still have a conversation with someone sitting across from me and laugh at how adorable that smile is. I can still do a spontaneous yoga pose, still think about the complexities of life, still be myself through all of this stirring. And that’s awesome.

Okay. My risotto metaphor is done now. You may now proceed with your life.

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This was one awesome risotto. I mean, sweet potatoes, fried sage, AND white wine?! Sign me up again. It was heavenly. Ugh. Now I’m hungry again.

So, make this risotto (possibly for me, cough, but wait, I can make this for myself hahahaha) and think deep thoughts about life and then just rejoice in delicious warm carbs. Good.

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Sweet Potato and Sage Risotto

Ingredients

Prep Time 5 min
Cooking Time 50 minutes, ish, I don't know, really
Total Time 1 hour, ish
Yield 4 servings

3 tablespoons of olive oil

8 large sage leaves

1 red onion, chopped

2 large cloves of garlic, minced

1 cup of arborio rice

1 cup of white wine

3 cups (approximately) of vegetable broth

Salt, to taste

A pinch of nutmeg

A pinch of smoked paprika

1 cup of roasted sweet potato puree

3/4 cup of shredded parmesan cheese

Directions

In the bottom of a Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat until glistening. Once hot, add the sage leaves, and fry until they are crispy and beginning to turn brown around the edges, about 2-3 minutes. Transfer the fried sage leaves to paper towels and set aside.

To the sage-infused olive oil in the Dutch oven or heavy pot, add the chopped red onion and saute with a pinch of salt until beginning to soften and turn translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for 1 minute longer, then pour in the rice. Stir frequently for two minutes, then slowly pour in the white wine.

Bring everything to a bubble, then reduce the heat to low, and cook, stirring continuously, until all of the wine has been dissolved. Once things start to look dry again, slowly pour in a cup of the vegetable broth and keep stirring frequently until the liquid is again absorbed. Keep repeating this process until the risotto is thick, creamy, and the rice is fairly (BUT NOT TOTALLY) soft when you take a bite.

Yes, you have to stir constantly. Use it as an excuse for why you didn’t do your AP Stats homework. And no, I don’t know how approximately long this is going to take, or how much liquid you’re gonna have to add. Risotto is one of those things where you sit back, relax, taste as you go, and you’ll know when it’s done. Trust me.

When you think the risotto is just about done, add the nutmeg, smoked paprika, roasted sweet potato puree, and salt to taste. Stir continuously to slightly thicken the risotto, about 3-4 minutes, then taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary. (Hey buddy, go easy on the nutmeg! It can overpower easily!) When you’re satisfied, stir in the cheese and remove from the heat.

Serve immediately with the fried sage leaves on top. Please pour yourself a glass of wine, because I can’t yet. Thank you.


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Until next time, my loves. <3 <3 <3


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Sweet Potato and Sage Risotto

January 27, 2016 Print this page

A lot of people get intimidated by risotto, but you really shouldn’t–it’s super easy to make, and it’s a delicious, hearty dinner for a cold winter night. I gave one of my favorite dishes a fresh new spin by frying some sage leaves, adding a splash (a, er, rather large splash) of white wine, and stirring in some roasted sweet potato puree just before serving.

Ingredients

Prep Time 5 min
Cooking Time 50 minutes, ish, I don't know, really
Total Time 1 hour, ish
Yield 4 servings

3 tablespoons of olive oil

8 large sage leaves

1 red onion, chopped

2 large cloves of garlic, minced

1 cup of arborio rice

1 cup of white wine

3 cups (approximately) of vegetable broth

Salt, to taste

A pinch of nutmeg

A pinch of smoked paprika

1 cup of roasted sweet potato puree

3/4 cup of shredded parmesan cheese

Directions

In the bottom of a Dutch oven or other large, heavy pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat until glistening. Once hot, add the sage leaves, and fry until they are crispy and beginning to turn brown around the edges, about 2-3 minutes. Transfer the fried sage leaves to paper towels and set aside.

To the sage-infused olive oil in the Dutch oven or heavy pot, add the chopped red onion and saute with a pinch of salt until beginning to soften and turn translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and saute for 1 minute longer, then pour in the rice. Stir frequently for two minutes, then slowly pour in the white wine.

Bring everything to a bubble, then reduce the heat to low, and cook, stirring continuously, until all of the wine has been dissolved. Once things start to look dry again, slowly pour in a cup of the vegetable broth and keep stirring frequently until the liquid is again absorbed. Keep repeating this process until the risotto is thick, creamy, and the rice is fairly (BUT NOT TOTALLY) soft when you take a bite.

Yes, you have to stir constantly. Use it as an excuse for why you didn’t do your AP Stats homework. And no, I don’t know how approximately long this is going to take, or how much liquid you’re gonna have to add. Risotto is one of those things where you sit back, relax, taste as you go, and you’ll know when it’s done. Trust me.

When you think the risotto is just about done, add the nutmeg, smoked paprika, roasted sweet potato puree, and salt to taste. Stir continuously to slightly thicken the risotto, about 3-4 minutes, then taste and adjust the seasonings as necessary. (Hey buddy, go easy on the nutmeg! It can overpower easily!) When you’re satisfied, stir in the cheese and remove from the heat.

Serve immediately with the fried sage leaves on top. Please pour yourself a glass of wine, because I can’t yet. Thank you.


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Sweet Potato Chips

December 27, 2013 Print this page

While we all know some fat is great for your health, it’s still not a great idea to be frying stuff up in cups and cups of it. These chips get the job done just as well–but in the oven!

Ingredients

Prep Time 5 min
Cooking Time 25 min
Total Time 30 min
Yield 4 servings

2 tablespoons of coconut oil, plus more for greasing

2 large sweet potatoes

Salt and pepper

Chili powder, garlic or onion powder, dried herbs (optional)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees and grease two large baking sheets with coconut oil. Allow yourself plenty of time for baking to ensure maximum crispiness.

Peel and thinly slice two large sweet potatoes into 1/8-inch rounds. You can use a mandolin, but I personally prefer my trusty kitchen knife.

Toss the rounds in the coconut oil, place on the baking sheets, and sprinkle the tops with salt and pepper. If you want to add some extra flavorings, like chipotle chili pepper, garlic/onion powder, or dried herbs, feel free to do so!

Bake until beginning to discolor on one side, about 10 to 12 minutes, then flip over and bake until crispy, anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes longer depending on oven rack position and evenness of temperature.

Allow to cool for at least 5 minutes before serving so the chips have time to harden a bit.


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Crispy Sweetbreads (gluten-free, dairy-free, Paleo)

May 18, 2013 Leave your thoughts Print this page

When I was maybe 10 or 11, I went out to dinner with my family and saw “sweetbreads” on the menu. Being the carb-o-holic I was, I decided to order them. Sugary pieces of bread…what could be bad?

Upon putting in my request with the waiter, my parents explained to me that sweetbreads were not an appetizer version of a dessert: they were in fact something completely different. I immediately opted for something else instead…because I did not want to eat a thymus gland.

Last month while in Florida with my mom, I again saw sweetbreads on the menu. This time, I ordered them, and they were fantastic.

After seeing The Domestic Man post about his lamb sweetbreads, I knew it was time to try cooking these guys myself. Both the butchers and my parents seemed to doubt my abilities, but my attempt proved to be very successful.

Honestly, there’s nothing much to it but to do it. You don’t need very many ingredients or fancy equipment; you just need a good couple of hours to cook. My recipe is adapted from Mark Bittman’s in How to Cook Everything.

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First, you’re going to need about a pound of, well, sweetbreads. You’ll probably want to get them at a butcher or US Wellness Meats.

Bring a big pot of water to a boil. Once it’s vigorously bubbling, turn the heat down slightly and stir in 1/2 tablespoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of red wine vinegar. Gently drop the sweetbreads in and cook for 10 minutes.

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Drain the sweetbreads and run under cold water until cool to the touch, about 7 minutes. If you see any loose pieces of membrane, peel them off—it’s not a big deal if you don’t get every piece.

Dry the sweetbreads off with a paper towel, then transfer to a clean plate. Place another plate on top of the sweetbreads, and weigh it down with a bunch of cans. (I used five 14.5 ounce cans of coconut milk.) Transfer to the fridge for 1 to 3 hours.

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When you’re ready to cook, cut the sweetbreads into 1/2-inch slices. Toss in 3/4 cup of arrowroot flour, making sure to shake off any excess coating.

Heat 1/4 cup of duck fat over medium-high heat in a large skillet. Once hot, add half the sweetbreads and fry until golden brown, about 3 to 5 minutes. Every couple of minutes, sprinkle with a little bit of salt.

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Flip over and fry until golden brown on the other side, about 2 to 3 minutes longer. Transfer the sweetbreads to a paper towel-lined plate, and add the rest to the pan, adding more fat if necessary. Follow the same steps for the second batch.

When all of the sweetbreads have been cooked, pour in 1/2 cup of wine wine to the hot pan. Let bubble for 3 to 4 minutes, then squeeze in the juice of half a lemon.

Drizzle a little sauce and a drop of lemon juice atop each sweetbread to serve.

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To accompany these crunchy bits of goodness, I made a simple parsnip puree and sweet potato chips.

Have you ever tried sweetbreads? Am I crazy for trying them? Leave me a comment on Facebook and let me know!


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Savory Steamers with Sweet Potato Chips (gluten-free, dairy-free, Paleo)

May 1, 2013 Leave your thoughts Print this page

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I am very fortunate to have many food lovers in my life. One of those people is my awesome band director, whose specialty is…you guessed it, seafood.

Using his tips, I created a lick-your-bowl-clean dinner that was both satisfying and really easy to make. You don’t have to be a five-star chef to turn out this delicious meal!

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Before you start cooking, chop up 1 large onion, 2 stalks of celery, plus a handful of their leaves, 1 large carrot, and 4 cloves of garlic. Don’t leave out the celery leaves—they really help the dish shine.

Heat about 2 tablespoons of ghee or butter in a big pot over medium heat. Meanwhile, scrub off some Littleneck clams in the sink. I made 24 for 3 people, so figure about 8 per person. 

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Once the ghee or butter is hot and melted, add the onion and saute until soft, about 4 minutes. Then, add in the celery, celery leaves, carrot, and garlic and continue cooking until beginning to brown, about 6 to 7 minutes longer. Do not season with salt, or if you do, only add a little bit.

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Turn the heat down to medium-low and pour in 1 cup of stock (I used my homemade duck stock) and about 3/4 cup of white wine. Bring to a boil before adding the clams, covering the pot with a lid, and steaming until the clams have just opened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Don’t overcook them!

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Scoop up the clams and a bunch of the broth into a bowl, and dig in. It’s as easy as that!

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In French-style bistros, French fries are usually served with steamed shellfish. My sweet potato fries haven’t been turning out too well lately, so I decided to make sweet potato chips instead. They were fabulous, if I do say so myself.

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees and grease two large baking sheets with olive or coconut oil. Allow yourself plenty of time for baking to ensure maximum crispiness. 

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Peel and thinly slice two large sweet potatoes into 1/8-inch rounds. You can use a mandolin, but I personally prefer my trusty kitchen knife. 

Toss the rounds in about 2 tablespoons of olive oil, place on the baking sheets, and sprinkle the tops with salt and pepper. If you want to add some extra flavorings, like chipotle chili pepper, garlic/onion powder, or dried herbs, feel free to do so!

Bake until beginning to discolor on one side, about 10 to 12 minutes, then flip over and bake until crispy, anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes longer depending on oven rack position and evenness of temperature.

Allow to cool for at least 5 minutes before serving so the chips have time to harden a bit.

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What’s your favorite bistro or pub dish? Leave me a comment on Facebook and let me know!


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